@TAGraves

Philosophy Blog

Conciliationism and Its Commitments

Click here to download this paper!

Conciliationism is often motivated by appealing to intuitive cases. I argue that this is a mistake and obscures the real commitments of the conciliationist. Instead, I motivate conciliationism by appealing to a plausible picture of belief formation and four intuitive principles: the Independence Principle, the Enkratic Principle, the Equal Weight View, and the Opaque Evidence Principle. I see three upshots to this approach. First, it clarifies the nature of conciliationism and shows that it is not committed to, for example, the Uniqueness Thesis. Second, it clarifies the positions of the opponents of conciliationism. Third, it easily incorporates non-ideal cases, such as cases where interlocutors are not peers.

Read more...

A Speculation on Kierkegaard’s Repetition and the Atonement

Click here to download this paper!

Repetition for Kierkegaard has three distinct yet connected aspects: a repeated event, an existential movement, and an identity-forming process.In this paper, I examine the atonement in light of repetition. I first examine the concept of repetition itself. I then trace the implications of repetition for creation, sin, and the atonement. Throughout the paper, I utilize Kierkegaard’s concepts of absurdity and farce. I also draw on the life of Christ and the other writings of the New Testament. Ultimately, I find that repetition provides a unique explanation for the work of God in the world.

This paper, written over a year ago, needs a lot of touching up. Indeed, at the time of writing I was ignorant of a lot of Kierkegaard’s work that would’ve informed the paper. Nevertheless, it serves as a fine introduction to some of the key concepts of repetition.

Read more...